Tag Archives: 苏州桑拿会所

Study examines health behaviors in children postcancer diagnosis

first_img Source:https://newsroom.wiley.com/press-release/psycho-oncology/researchers-examine-health-behaviors-after-childhood-cancer-diagnosis Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 7 2018In a Psycho-Oncology study of childhood cancer survivors, several health behaviors fell short of expectations for exercise and diet during early survivorship, and they remained sub-optimal upon reaching five years post-diagnosis.The study followed families of children with cancer (ages 5-17 at recruitment) from diagnosis through five years. Three years and five years post-diagnosis, 82 survivors and 103 mothers of survivors completed questionnaires assessing exercise, dietary, and sleep patterns among survivors.Related StoriesUsing machine learning algorithm to accurately diagnose breast cancerBacteria in the birth canal linked to lower risk of ovarian cancerHow cell-free DNA can be targeted to prevent spread of tumorsAt three- and five-years post-diagnosis, mothers’ and survivors’ responses indicated that few survivors engaged in appropriate levels of low-intensity exercise, fruit/vegetable intake, and dairy consumption; however, most survivors engaged in recommended levels of high intensity exercise, fast food restriction, and sleep. Higher income was associated with decreased intake of fast food over time, whereas lower income was associated with increased intake.”Childhood cancer survivors are at elevated risk for a multitude of conditions later in life, and greater engagement in healthy habits may be particularly important for this population,” said lead author Rachel Fisher, of Nationwide Children’s Hospital, in Columbus. “These findings emphasize that there is much work to be done to ensure that these survivors enjoy full, healthy lives.”last_img read more

Better diet could alleviate symptoms of depression finds study

first_imgThe study from Western Sydney University, looked at 16 clinical trials that analyzed 45,826 people who had modified their diets to alleviate their symptoms of depression and anxiety. The clinical trials were from a more than one nation including Australia, Brazil, Canada, Italy and the UK. Lead researcher Dr Joseph Firth from Western Sydney University said that the major change that their diets involved was reducing “junk food intake” and replacing high fat and high sugar foods with foods that are rich in nutrients and fibres such as fruits and vegetables. Dr Firth said, “We took a bit of a close look at the data and interestingly found there was no significant differences in the types of diets used… Weight loss diets were just as effective as nutrient boosting diets.” This means that no “extreme diets” are necessary for depression, he explained. What is needed is a change in the basics he said. Dr. Firth added that the study did not find a beneficial effect of diets on anxiety disorders and women with depression were found to benefit more with an altered diet than men.Related StoriesSome children are at greater risk of ongoing depression long after being bulliedNew structured approach to managing patients with depression in primary careStudy reveals link between inflammatory diet and colorectal cancer riskDr. Firth said that there have been studies showing that regular exercise can have a protective effect against depression. This is the first study to prove that a healthy diet can also play a role in reducing the symptoms of depression. He explained that an average Australian individual consumes around 19 servings of junk food per week and much less amount of the recommended fruits, vegetables and whole grains that are rich in nutrients and fibre.The authors emphasize that diet is not a replacement to tested and accepted treatments of depressive illness including medications and psychotherapy. However diets can be an additional remedy they said. They call for public health campaigns to emphasize upon healthy diet and its effects on the mental health. “Public health schemes are trying to improve people’s diets and looking at the physical health outcomes… and focusing on combating things like obesity… They should also pay attention to actual positive mental health outcomes that could occur and improve people’s diets on a large scale to fix people’s psychological well being,” Dr. Firth said.“Thus, depressive disorders incur considerable burden not only for individuals, but also for society due to the high economic cost from lost productivity and demand on healthcare services,” The authors write. Authors add that dietary interventions could be a “novel” approach to depression and conclude, “Future research is required to determine the specific components of dietary interventions that improve mental health, explore underlying mechanisms, and establish effective schemes for delivering these interventions in clinical and public health settings.”In 2017 and 2018, there has been a rise in depressive illness with at least one in five Australian experiencing a mental illness (13.1 per cent had anxiety and 10.4 per cent felt depressed). Women were more vulnerable than men, say reports. A healthy balanced diet. Image Credit: Syda Productions / Shutterstock By Dr. Ananya Mandal, MDFeb 5 2019It has been speculated earlier that a healthy diet can raise the mood and reduce symptoms of mild depression. A new study proves the cause and effect of healthy diet and improved symptoms of depression.The results of the new study titled, “The effects of dietary improvement on symptoms of depression and anxiety: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials,” was published this week in the latest issue of the journal Psychosomatic Medicine.center_img Source:https://insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00006842-900000000-98656last_img read more

Researchers use deep learning to build automatic speech recognition system to help

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. A new research project at Rochester Institute of Technology will help ensure the endangered language of the Seneca Indian Nation will be preserved. Using deep learning, a form of artificial intelligence, RIT researchers are building an automatic speech recognition application to document and transcribe the traditional language of the Seneca people. The work is also intended to be a technological resource to preserve other rare or vanishing languages. “The motivation for this is personal. The first step in the preservation and revitalization of our language is documentation of it,” said Robert Jimerson (Seneca), a computing and information sciences doctoral student at RIT and member of the research team. He brought together tribal elders and close friends, all speakers of Seneca, to help produce audio and textual documentation of this Native American language spoken fluently by fewer than 50 individuals.Like all languages, Seneca has different dialects. It also presents unique challenges because of its complex system for building new words, in which a whole sentence can be expressed in a single word.Jimerson is able to bridge both the technology and the language.”Under the hood, it is data. With many Native languages, you don’t have that volume of data,” he said, explaining that some languages, while spoken, may not have as many formal linguistical tools—dictionaries, grammatical materials or extensive classes for non-native speakers, similar to those for Spanish or Chinese. “One of the most expensive and time-consuming processes of documenting language is collecting and transcribing it. We are looking at taking deep networks and maybe changing the architecture, making some synthetic data to create more data, but how do you make this work in deep learning? How do you augment data you already have?”That process of attaining data is being coordinated by a wide-ranging team that includes Jimerson; the project principal investigator Emily Prud’hommeaux, assistant professor of computer science at Boston College and research faculty in RIT’s College of Liberal Arts; Ray Ptucha, assistant professor of computer engineering in RIT’s Kate Gleason College of Engineering and an expert in deep learning systems and technologies; and Karen Michaelson, professor of linguistics, the State University of New York at Buffalo. The research team was awarded $181, 682 in funding over four years from the National Science Foundation for “Collaborative Research: Deep learning speech recognition for document Seneca and other acutely under-resourced languages.” “This is an exciting project because it brings together people from so many disciplines and backgrounds, from engineering and computer science to linguistics and language pedagogy,” said Prud’hommeaux. “In addition to enabling us to develop cutting edge technology, this project supports undergraduate and graduate students and engages members of an indigenous community that few people know is right here in western New York.”The researchers started the project in late June, bringing together the community members and linguists for data collection—acquiring and translating current and new, original recordings of Seneca conversations then converting data into textual output using deep learning models.”What you are really trying to do is find that line between the new data you can get and the changing of the architecture of a network,” Jimerson explained.Since the summer, the team has just over 50 hours of recorded material with people working full time on the translations that include breaking down the language into individual phonetic symbols and using this information to begin training the models.”We use a process called transfer learning which starts with a model trained with readily available English speech to get the basic, initial training for the system, then we’ll re-train the neural networks and fine tune it toward the Seneca language. We’re getting very good results,” said Ptucha, who is an expert in deep learning systems and technologies. Deep learning technology consists of multiple layers of artificial neurons, organized in an increasingly abstract hierarchy. These architectures have produced state-of-the-art results on all types of pattern recognition problems including image and speech recognition applications.”No one has really tried this before, training an automated speech recognition model on something as resource-constrained as Seneca. Robbie is the expert in transcribing Seneca and training the others on how to do this. He’s a pretty rare guy, ” said Ptucha,This current project is a continuation of Jimerson’s work to expand the language resources available to his community. In 2013, while he was a graduate student in RIT’s Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences, he developed an online Seneca language translation dictionary for the Seneca Language Revitalization Program. The project was funded by the Seneca Nation and awarded to RIT’s Future Steward’s Program. Left to right, Ray Ptucha, computer engineering assistant professor, Robbie Jimerson, computer science doctoral student, both from RIT, and Emily Prud’hommeaux, assistant professor of computer science, are leading the NSF project to use artificial intelligence technology to preserve the Seneca language. Credit: A. Sue Weisler/RIT Using multi-task learning for low-latency speech translation Explore further Citation: Researchers use deep learning to build automatic speech recognition system to help preserve the Seneca language (2018, October 15) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-10-deep-automatic-speech-recognition-seneca.html Provided by Rochester Institute of Technologylast_img read more

Five sent to hospital on sixth day of Pamplona bull run

first_imgRevellers sprint near bulls and steers during the running of the bulls at the San Fermin festival in Pamplona, Spain, July 12, 2019. REUTERS/Susana VeraPAMPLONA, Spain (Reuters) – One man was gored and at least four other people were sent to hospital with injuries following the sixth day of the running of the bulls at the San Fermin festival in the northern Spanish city of Pamplona, the Red Cross said on Friday. Each morning at 8 a.m. (0600 GMT) between July 7 and 14 as part of the week-long festival thousands line the streets of the medieval city to take part in the centuries-old tradition of running with the bulls. In the 875-meter chase through the narrow streets of the city a half dozen, specially bred, aggressive bulls, led by six larger, more docile steers race from their pen to the city’s bull ring as runners dodge horns and stampeding hooves. Friday’s run lasted just two minutes and 18 seconds, though most runners sprint just briefly before being overtaken by the herd. The bulls are later killed in the bull ring by matadors. Reporting by Susana Vera; writing by Paul Day; editing by Jason NeelyOur Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.last_img read more

37 trains cancelled 16 diverted day after Amritsar tragedy37 trains cancelled 16

first_imgrailway accident Published on The railways cancelled 37 trains and diverted 16 trains on Saturday, a day after Dussehra revellers were mowed down by a train while they were watching the burning of a Ravan effigy while standing on the tracks near Amritsar, officials said.Sixty-one people were killed and more than 70 injured in the tragedy. Giving details, the railways said 10 mail/express trains and 27 passenger trains were cancelled. While 16 trains were diverted and reached their destination through a different route, 18 trains were short terminated, Northern Railways spokesperson Deepak Kumar said.The route between Jalandhar and Amritsar was suspended, he said. The railways maintains it had no information about the Dussehra function held near the tracks. Chairman Railway Board Ashwani Lohani said in a statement that the accident occurred at a midsection between the Amritsar and Manawala stations and not at a level crossing. “There was no information and no permission sought from us. The event took place at a place adjoining the railway land in private property,” he said.“At midsections trains run at their assigned speeds and people are not expected to be on the tracks. At midsections there is no railway staff posted. We have staff at the level crossings whose job is to regulate traffic,” he added, explaining why the railways was not alerted about the congregation by its staff.According to Lohani, the gateman was 400 metres away at a level crossing. If the driver had applied emergency breaks, there could have been a bigger tragedy, he said.The train was running at assigned speed and initial reports suggest that the driver applied brakes and the train slowed down, the top official said.Refusing to assign any blame, Lohani, who visited the spot at midnight, said the the national transporter has been carrying out campaigns exhorting people not to trespass. “We will take that forward,” he said. COMMENT SHARE SHARE EMAILcenter_img October 20, 2018 SHARE COMMENTSlast_img read more