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Khwaabb trailer gets 1,22,000 hits in 10 days

first_imgNo big names, no formula! Yet the trailer of forthcoming sports-based movie Khwaabb has received 1,22,000 views within 10 days of its release on YouTube. The director is overwhelmed.”The response is a proof that people have not closed minds towards experimental cinema,” Zaid Ali Khan, director of the movie, told IANS through SMS.”It’s very exciting to see this kind of a response and just goes to show that people are open to different, experimental and independent cinema,” he added.The movie deals with the life of an athlete and a swimmer and their dream to win an Olympic medal for India.The first trailer was released Aug 23 in the capital and it was uploaded online Aug 24.”I am very overwhelmed and I never expected such an amazing response,” said Khan.Made with newcomers Navdip Singh and Simran Motiani in the lead roles along with Nafisa Ali and Bajrang Bali Singh, it has been produced by Delhi-based production house, Bullseye Production.The film is slated for an October release.Watch the trailer here:last_img read more

10 months agoManchester return? Real Madrid dismiss anti-Man Utd clause claim for Diaz

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Manchester return? Real Madrid dismiss anti-Man Utd clause claim for Diazby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveReal Madrid have dismissed claims have an anti-Manchester United clause in their deal for Brahim Diaz.The Spanish midfielder is leaving Manchester City for Real today in a deal rising to €20m. Diaz will sign a Madrid contract to 2025.The agreement includes a 15 per cent sell-on clause, however English media claims of an anti-United clause have been dismissed, says AS.It was suggested City had demanded a clause stating that if Diaz was sold to United, Real would pay 40 per cent of the fee to the Blues. However, this claim has been denied.Diaz will be presented to local media and fans on Monday at the Santiago Bernabeu. last_img read more

10 months agoAgent: Southampton will regret losing Gabbiadini

first_imgAgent: Southampton will regret losing Gabbiadiniby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveManolo Gabbadini’s agent says Southampton will regret losing the Italy striker.Samp have agreed to re-sign Gabbiadini on loan with a €12m obligation to buy from Southampton.“He felt good at Sampdoria and wanted to go back home,” Silvio Pagliari told Sky Sport Italia from Milan Linate airport, where he was waiting for the 27-year-old.“We wouldn’t have gone anywhere on loan. It was his will to cut the cord with Southampton, although he had a great time there.“He also discussed tactics with Sampdoria and I’m sure he’ll carve out a place in the team.“He’s a good player and, in my opinion, one of the best strikers in Italy.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

No letup for Trudeau as difficult 2018 gives way to wild election

first_imgOTTAWA — Fasten your seatbelt, Canada. It’s going to be a bumpy ride to next fall’s national election.The past year has been a turbulent one on the Canadian political scene and the coming year is bound to get that much more tumultuous as politicians prepare for what both Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer have predicted will be a nasty campaign.Think of the first six months of 2019 as the semi-finals, with party leaders jostling for position, test-driving their messages and refining their trash talk at opposing teams. The finals will begin when Parliament breaks at the end of June, even though the writ won’t officially drop until Sept. 1, at the earliest, for the vote scheduled on Oct. 21.Trudeau’s Liberals and Scheer’s Conservatives are the main competitors as they head into playoff season; the NDP, Greens and Maxime Bernier’s breakaway People’s Party are bit players but potentially positioned as spoilers who will determine which of the two leading contenders walks off with the prize.But if the past year is any measure, there will doubtless be numerous twists and turns.For Trudeau, 2018 started with a disastrous trip to India that resulted in a slump in popularity from which he and the Liberals never seemed to fully recover. Despite a relatively robust economy, the lowest jobless numbers in 40 years and managing to navigate roller-coaster negotiations to renew the North American Free Trade Agreement, Trudeau has been beset by events that have interrupted his good-news narrative.There was mercurial U.S. President Donald Trump slapping tariffs on Canadian steel and aluminum and calling Trudeau “weak” and “dishonest” when he spoke out against them.There was the continuing tide of asylum seekers crossing into Canada at unofficial border crossings.And there was the court ruling that shut down work on the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project the Liberals paid $4.5 billion to buy. The ruling knocked down one pillar of Trudeau’s signature promise to tackle climate change by balancing economic growth and environmental protection.And it shook the other pillar — imposing a price on carbon, starting in April — at a time when some of Trudeau’s most reliable provincial Liberal allies on climate change were being replaced by fierce conservative opponents —Doug Ford in Ontario and Blaine Higgs in New Brunswick, who promptly joined Saskatchewan’s Scott Moe in challenging the constitutionality of Trudeau’s carbon tax, along with Manitoba’s Brian Pallister.The pipeline issue has produced angry protests in Alberta, where talk about separating from Canada has been revived, fuelled in part by Quebec Premier Francois Legault’s dismissal of another pipeline to ship Alberta’s “dirty energy” to eastern Canada.After enduring a summer diplomatic meltdown by Saudi Arabia over a Global Affairs tweet, Trudeau is now ending the year in a bitter dispute with China over Canada’s arrest of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou at the behest of the United States. China has detained Canadians in apparent retaliation.While Trudeau insists there was no political interference and Canada is simply abiding by the rule of law, Trump has once again complicated his life by implying Meng’s arrest was a ploy to gain leverage in trade talks with China.For all that, pollster David Coletto says Trudeau retains considerable goodwill with voters as he heads into an election year. But an economic slump would undermine Trudeau’s contention that his government has chosen the right path by running up steep annual deficits to invest in things that spur economic growth. The Liberals’ failure to even set a date for a return to balanced budgets, contrary to their 2015 platform promise to do so by 2019, is already among Canadians’ top worries and No. 1 on Scheer’s hit list.There’s no telling what else could happen, particularly with the unpredictable Trump next door.“For me, the big theme is do the Liberals look like they’re in control of what’s happening?” says Coletto, CEO of Abacus Data.“I think their greatest weakness or liability is the sense that they’ve lost control over the budget, over the relationship with China, the relationship with Trump, questions around affordability  … You can imagine the narrative being developed by the Conservatives to say that this prime minister has just lost control, that he can’t manage the complex world we live in,” he adds.“It hasn’t fully happened yet but you can imagine that’s a broader issue that’s driven by smaller ones happening across the board that builds into a perfect storm that I think is very damaging to the Liberals politically.”Indeed, Scheer appears to have already adopted the “out-of-control” narrative, dubbing 2018 “a year of failure for Justin Trudeau” on virtually every front.The risk in that approach, however, is that it will strike Canadians as overly simplistic and negative, particularly if Scheer is unable to convince them that he would be able to control the situation. Moreover, Coletto says Trudeau is shielded from such attacks — at least for now — by the fact that there remains a sizeable number of Canadians who still believe he has the country’s best interests at heart and is doing his best in complicated circumstances.While the two leading contenders duke it out, developments among the other parties could be crucial to the outcome of the election, starting with an early February byelection in B.C.’s Burnaby South, where NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh hopes to turn around his party’s flagging fortunes by winning a seat in the House of Commons.The Liberals, who benefit when the NDP is lacklustre, are hoping Singh wins; they don’t want New Democrats to dump him before the election and potentially choose a more appealing leader who could siphon off progressive votes. Conservatives, who win when the centre-left vote is split, are equally fervent in hoping the NDP can get its act together by Oct. 21.Coletto believes it’s too early to write Singh off, assuming he can win the byelection, or the NDP, regardless of its leadership. His research suggests that just under 10 per cent of Canadians who back a specific party today say they’re very likely to change their minds between now and the election.“The real fluidity is on the left side of the spectrum, it’s the Liberals and New Democrats and Greens and where those voters — more of them voted Liberal last time but some of them have now left that red tent — where do they end up? So I think there is a potential volatility,” Coletto says.By contrast, he says, “The Conservative vote is much more solid.”Which is not to say the Conservatives won’t face their own potential for vote splitting. Bernier’s upstart People’s Party has thus far not made much of a dent in Tory support but Coletto notes it doesn’t have to win any seats to have an impact. If it siphons off just one percentage point of votes from the Conservatives, it could help Liberals win in close-fought ridings and make the difference between a minority or majority government.Moreover, Coletto says Bernier, who prides himself on his willingness to take politically dangerous stances on things like supply management, immigration and multiculturalism, may force Scheer to go further down those roads than he’d like — or than mainstream Canadians are comfortable with — to protect his right flank.Which would likely suit Trudeau just fine. He’s already trying to frame the election as a choice between positive Liberals who try to bring Canadians together and divisive Conservatives who prey on Canadians’ fears and prejudices.It’s essentially a replay of one of the major themes of the 2015 campaign and one Coletto says might actually have more resonance now as the vast majority of Canadians recoil in horror from Trump’s angry, divisive style of politics. If so, Trudeau might finally have a reason to thank Trump.Joan Bryden, The Canadian Presslast_img read more

US slaps 220 per cent duty on Canadas Bombardier jets

first_imgWASHINGTON – The Commerce Department slapped duties of nearly 220 per cent on Canada’s Bombardier C Series aircraft Tuesday in a victory for Boeing that is likely to raise tensions between the United States and its allies Canada and Britain.Commerce ruled that Montreal-based Bombardier used unfair government subsidies to sell jets at artificially low prices in the U.S.“The U.S. values its relationships with Canada, but even our closest allies must play by the rules,” Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said.Canada responded by saying it “strongly disagrees” with the U.S. move.“This is clearly aimed at eliminating Bombardier’s C Series aircraft from the U.S. market,” said Chrystia Freeland, Canada’s minister of foreign affairs.Bombardier, meanwhile, called the decision “absurd …. U.S. trade laws were never intended to be used in this manner, and Boeing is seeking to use a skewed process to stifle competition.”In April, Boeing charged that Bombardier had received at least $3 billion in subsidies from the governments of Britain, Canada and the province of Quebec. The Chicago-based aircraft manufacturer asked the Commerce Department and the U.S. International Trade Commission to investigate the alleged “predatory pricing.”Specifically, Boeing said that Bombardier last year sold Delta Air Lines 75 CS100 aircraft for less than it cost to build them.“Subsidies enabled Bombardier to dump its product into the U.S. market, harming aerospace workers in the United States and throughout Boeing’s global supply chain,” Boeing said Tuesday.But Delta has said Boeing did not even make the 100-seat jets it needed.“Boeing has no American-made product to offer because it cancelled production of its only aircraft in this size range — the 717 — more than 10 years ago,” Delta said in a statement Tuesday.President Donald Trump campaigned on a promise to get tough on trade. He has repeatedly criticized Canada, saying it unfairly blocks U.S. dairy products and subsidizes its softwood lumber industry. Trump also has threatened to pull out of the North American Free Trade Agreement if he can’t negotiate a better version with Canada and Mexico.Boeing’s complaint against Bombardier drew a backlash even before Tuesday’s decision. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau threatened this month to stop doing business with Boeing, which is in talks to sell Canada 18 Super Hornet jet fighters. British Prime Minister Theresa May has discussed the case with Trump. Her concern: Bombardier employs more than 4,000 workers in Northern Ireland.Connecticut Democratic Sens. Richard Blumenthal and Christopher Murphy last week wrote a letter urging U.S. government officials to “refrain from taking action that will endanger the many jobs in Connecticut that depend upon Bombardier.” Engines for the C Series aircraft are made by Pratt & Whitney, based in East Hartford, Connecticut.Commerce’s findings Tuesday aren’t the end of the matter. The department is expected to announce its findings in another case against Bombardier early next month. Then the International Trade Commission — an independent federal agency that rules on trade cases — will decide early next year whether to uphold Commerce’s duties.Bombardier could appeal any sanctions to a U.S. court or to a dispute-resolution panel created under NAFTA. The Canadian government could also take the case to the World Trade Organization in Geneva._____________________________________Gillies reported from TorontoFollow Paul Wiseman on Twitter at https://twitter.com/PaulWisemanAPlast_img read more

US gets tougher on Russia new sanctions accusations

first_imgWASHINGTON – In its toughest challenge to Russia to date, the Trump administration accused Moscow on Thursday of an elaborate plot to penetrate America’s electric grid, factories, water supply and even air travel through cyber hacking. The U.S. also hit targeted Russians with sanctions for alleged election meddling for the first time since President Donald Trump took office.The list of Russians being punished includes all 13 indicted last month by special counsel Robert Mueller, a tacit acknowledgement by the administration that at least some of Mueller’s Russia-related probe has merit.Trump has repeatedly sought to discredit Mueller’s investigation into Russian interference in the presidential election, but the sanctions appeared to rely on the special counsel’s legal conclusions in deciding who should be named. The sanctions freeze any assets the individuals may have in U.S. jurisdictions and bar Americans from doing business with them.The named Russians — 19 in all — are unlikely to have any assets in the United States that would be covered, making the move largely symbolic. But it could help inoculate the president from persistent claims he’s afraid or unwilling to stand up to Russian President Vladimir Putin or to fight back against efforts to undermine America’s democracy and domestic affairs.“We’re going to be tough on Russia until they decide to change their behaviour,” said White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders. At the same time, she left open the possibility of better U.S.-Russia co-operation, arguing that “if we can work together to combat world threats on things like North Korea, then we should.”U.S. national security officials said the FBI, Department of Homeland Security and intelligence agencies determined Russian intelligence and others were behind a broad range of cyberattacks starting a year ago. Russian hackers infiltrated the networks that run the basic services an Americans rely on each day: nuclear, water and manufacturing facilities like factories.The officials said the hackers chose their targets methodically, obtained access to computer systems, conducted “network reconnaissance” and then attempted to cover their tracks by deleting evidence of the intrusions. The U.S. government has helped the industries expel the Russians from all systems known to have been penetrated, but additional breaches could be discovered, said the officials, who briefed reporters on condition of anonymity to discuss sensitive national security information.The officials described Russia’s operation as ongoing.The U.S. accusations and accompanying sanctions mark a stepped-up attempt by Trump’s administration to show it’s adequately confronting Russia over hacking, election meddling and general efforts to compromise Western democracies and infrastructure. Trump on Thursday also joined the leaders of Britain, France and Germany in blaming Moscow for the poisoning of an ex-Russian spy who was living in England.The sanctions prompted a swift threat of retaliation from Russia’s government, which said a response was already being prepared. Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov suggested the Trump administration had timed the action to taint this weekend’s presidential election in Russia, in which President Vladimir Putin is expected to win an overwhelming victory.“It is tied to U.S. internal disorder, tied of course to our electoral calendar,” Ryabkov was quoted as saying by the Russian state news agency Tass.Altogether, 19 Russians were cited. Also sanctioned were five Russian companies, including the Internet Research Agency, which is accused of orchestrating a mass online disinformation campaign to affect the U.S. presidential election result.The U.S. Treasury Department announced the sanctions amid withering criticism in the U.S. accusing Trump and his administration of failing to use its congressionally mandated authority to punish Russia. The sanction targets include officials working for the Russian military intelligence agency GRU.The sanctions are the first use of the new powers that Congress passed last year to punish Moscow for interfering in the election that Trump won over Democrat Hillary Clinton.Yet Russia hawks in Congress deemed it too little, too late.“Even more must be done,” said Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina. GOP Sen. John McCain of Arizona called the action “overdue.”And Democrats homed in on the fact that the list of Russians hit with sanctions included all of those indicted by Mueller. That shows the administration believes the investigation is legitimate, they argued.Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer of New York said the sanctions prove that Mueller’s “investigation is not a ‘witch hunt’ as the president and his allies have claimed.” He said, “It’s more clear than ever that the president must not interfere with the special counsel’s investigation in any way.”The Treasury Department said the GRU and Russia’s military both interfered in the 2016 election and were “directly responsible” for the NotPetya cyberattack that hit businesses across Europe in June 2017, causing billions of dollars in damage by disrupting global shipping, trade and medicine production. Treasury said that the attack caused several U.S. hospitals to be unable to create electronic medical records for more than a week.Among those affected were Yevgeny Prigozhin, who is known as “Putin’s chef” and who ran the St. Petersburg-based Internet Research Agency, and 12 of the agency’s employees. They were included in Mueller’s indictment last month.The Russian agency “tampered with, altered or caused a misappropriation of information with the purpose or effect of interfering with or undermining election processes and institutions,” specifically the 2016 U.S. presidential race, the U.S. said.___Reach Matthew Lee on Twitter at http://twitter.com/APDiploWriter and Josh Lederman at http://twitter.com/joshledermanAPlast_img read more

PM flags off Lucknow Metros NorthSouth corridor

first_imgKanpur: Prime Minister Narendra Modi Friday flagged off the commercial run on Lucknow Metro’s North-South corridor through video conference from Kanpur. The length of the North-South corridor is 23 kilometre. Uttar Pradesh Governor Ram Naik, Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath, Deputy Chief Minister Keshav Prasad Maurya, Chandauli MP and state BJP chief Mahendra Nath Pandey, Kanpur MP Murli Manohar Joshi, along with other state ministers were present on the occasion. The prime minister also laid the foundation stone for Agra Metro Rail project. Modi also distributed keys of houses to the beneficiaries of PM Awas Yojana.last_img

Egypt police arrest 107 including 27 students

first_imgBy Mohamed AmmarCAIRO– Egyptian security forces have rounded up massive numbers of Muslim Brotherhood leaders and supporters since Morsi’s ouster on July 3A total of 107 people were arrested across Egypt on Wednesday, including 27 university students. In a statement, the Interior Ministry said that 80 people in three provinces had been detained on assault and incitement-to-violence charges.According to the statement, 19 people were arrested in the southern province of Minya, 59 in the central Fayoum province and two in Giza.On Wednesday, 21 students were arrested during clashes with security forces near Al-Azhar University’s Cairo campus, bringing the total number of detained Al-Azhar students to 49, a security source said.Six students were also detained during clashes at Cairo University, bringing the total number of detained students from that university to 24, the source said.According to the source, 11 policemen sustained birdshot injuries during the violence.Egyptian security forces have rounded up massive numbers of Muslim Brotherhood leaders and supporters since the July 3 ouster of elected president Mohamed Morsi by the military.Most have been charged with “inciting violence” – allegations the Islamist group says are politically-motivated.last_img read more

Deon Grants Wish Comes True Retires as NY Giant

Deon Grant had his mind set on one thing upon entering the NFL back in 2000—making sure he retired from the game as a New York Giant, so he could be one for the rest of his life.Grant, the defensive leader of the Giants Super Bowl XLVI champions, officially announced his retirement on Wednesday.In a statement provided by the Giant ball club, Grant said, “The Giants are a connection in my heart that I knew that I was supposed to be there. The last year that I signed there to go to the Super Bowl I could have signed with a bunch of teams, but I wanted to sign with the Giants. The way that the owners opened the doors and signed me back and the general manager (Jerry Reese) and the coaching staff … we did each other a favor, but it definitely solidified my career for me.”Grant, 34, played with the Carolina Panthers, Jacksonville Jaguars and Seattle Seahawks before signing with the Giants in 2010. After undergoing several surgeries to his shoulder, ankle and hand, he knew he’d had enough.Yet this might not be the last we see of the Giants’ safety, Grant hasn’t completely given up on the game and hopes to someday return as a coach.“I still study the game a lot,” he said. “I study the game because I think that’s going to be a place where I land on my feet as far as coaching. I do a lot of charity work, I have other businesses running for me, but my main thing right now is getting back into that whole football swing of things.” read more

The Spurs Noticed Serge Ibaka Wasnt on the Court

In the run up to Game 1 of the Western Conference Finals between the Oklahoma City Thunder and San Antonio Spurs, the Serge Ibaka story dominated the series. Ibaka injured his calf in the final game of the Thunder’s series against the Clippers and isn’t expected to return, leaving the Thunder without their starting power forward. It was clear how that might become a problem for the Thunder; Ibaka was one of the most active and effective rim defenders this season, according to the NBA’s SportVU Player Tracking. He defended an average of 9.5 shots at the rim per game (defined as any shot attempt where he was within 5 feet of both the basket and the shooter), seventh most in the league, and held opponents to 43.9 percent shooting on those attempts, sixth lowest among players who defended at least five shots at the rim per game.Without Ibaka on the floor, the Spurs partied down low Monday night, making 67 percent of their shots in the paint, 33 of 49 overall. With Ibaka healthy, the Thunder’s playoff opponents had made only 51 percent of their inside shots.Scott Brooks, Oklahoma City’s coach, decided to go small for much of Game 1, playing Kevin Durant at power forward and entirely neglecting a big lineup that had been instrumental in helping close out the Clippers. According to SportVU, the Thunder defended 34 shots at the rim Monday night, just a touch under the 35.1 they’ve been averaging in the playoffs. But far fewer of those shots were defended by front-court players — the tall guys.Thunder Defense at the RimDurant, Russell Westbrook and Reggie Jackson are fantastic, but their size offers less resistance at the rim than a guy nicknamed “Iblocka.” During the regular season, those three players combined to defend 6.3 shots at the rim per game. On Monday night, they defended 16. The Spurs made 12 of them.In Game 2, there may be an opportunity to play Steven Adams more minutes, but the Thunder simply don’t have the bodies to avoid these small lineups. If they can’t figure out how to assemble a better defensive structure with the players available, this series might not last long. read more