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INTERVIEW UN humanitarian official urges action to help South Sudan avoid collapse

“People are crying out for help,” Humanitarian Coordinator Toby Lanzer said in an interview with the UN News Centre. “We’re at a really desperate moment in South Sudan.” Less than three years after South Sudan gained independence from Sudan, the fledgling nation has been wracked by a conflict that has left thousands dead and some 870,000 displaced since it first erupted in mid-December. Some 77,000 people have sought protection at UN bases around the country. “When this crisis erupted in mid-December, I think many of us thought this would be a temporary situation – where people would be inside the United Nations bases. But now we’re into the third month and it’s very clear to us that people can’t go home. They’re too scared. They have nowhere to go,” said Mr. Lanzer.A veteran UN official with development, humanitarian and peacekeeping experience in Timor-Leste, Central African Republic and Sudan, among others, Mr. Lanzer stressed the need for the peace talks in the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa, to bear fruit. “We need a ceasefire that works, that works for civilians on the ground; that enables them to move, to go back to their homes, to look after their livestock, to plant and to cultivate,” he said. If this happens, it will go a long way to enabling the South Sudanese to get through the current crisis, he added. “But if they can’t move, if they cannot cultivate, I really fear that by the end of the year, South Sudan will have collapsed and gone into an even more desperate situation.”There are fears that tens of thousands will be newly displaced amid fresh fighting in Upper Nile state, following heavy clashes and reports of people being killed recently in churches and hospitals in the state capital, Malakal. Mr. Lanzer, who visited Malakal last week, described it as a ghost town. “The drive from the airport into town takes about 20 minutes. We didn’t see a single bicycle, pedestrian, car, not a dog, not a chicken, nothing.” South Sudan: Bringing Aid to Malakal (11 February ’14). Credit: UNHCRAs he and his team got closer to the centre of the town, he said, it became very clear that many atrocities had been committed there, as they saw the remains of people scattered along the roads. “Particularly troubling was when we’d reached the hospital and saw vultures flying overhead. And we went into the hospital and saw things that really beggar belief. The types of crimes that were committed there need to be investigated and our teams of course will be looking into these things and reporting on it.” As horrible as the situation was in Malakal, Mr. Lanzer said what he saw there was not unique. “I wish I could say that the situation in Malakal is the worst. but I think it’s very descriptive of the situation in other parts of the country. So many towns that I have visited in Upper Nile state, in Unity state, in Jonglei, have been destroyed, are deserted.“Having worked in Darfur, one of the things that I never, ever thought I would see is people fleeing into Darfur. Well now we’re seeing that. I mean that’s how bad the situation has got on the ground in South Sudan.” Mr. Lanzer, who is meeting with donors and others in New York and Washington D.C. this week, said the situation in South Sudan is a call to action for the international community to stand with the world’s youngest nation and not let it fail. “We do have the chance to stand with the people, to work with people during this time and to help them get through it. But we also have the chance of standing by and watching a situation unfold where there will be unprecedented loss of life,” he stated.“All of us now, whether we’re a party to the conflict, whether we’re a donor with resources or whether we’re a UN agency or an NGO, we need to step up and really stand with the people of South Sudan in their greatest hour of need.” read more

UN European officials concerned at deliberate attacks on civilians in Central African

“These attacks are intolerable violations of international law and the perpetrators must be held accountable,” UN Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs Valerie Amos and European Union Commissioner for International Cooperation, Humanitarian Aid and Crisis Response Kristalina Georgieva urged in a joint statement.“We call on all parties to the conflict, and on those who may have influence over them, to end attacks on civilians, schools, hospitals, religious sites and humanitarian aid workers,” they said. According to the statement, armed groups attacked a religious site hosting 10,000 displaced people in Bambari on 7 July, killing at least 26 people and injuring 35. This followed weeks of escalating violence in and around Bambari. Hospitals in the area were overwhelmed with people who need treatment for gunshot and machete wounds. Some 2.5 million Central Africans need assistance. More than half a million people, mainly women and children, have fled their homes and are living in temporary shelters, sometimes deep in the forest or in sites where they are at risk of attack. Waves of hungry, sick and exhausted refugees and returnees are arriving in neighbouring countries, putting a strain on host communities and creating a regional crisis. “Central Africans are surviving without the most vital necessities including food, medicines and clean water, and many are living in fear for their lives. We must stand with them and show them they are not alone,” the joint statement said. Ms. Amos and Ms. Georgieva called on the EU and UN Member States to step up their efforts, both on the security side and by finding new funding streams for humanitarian operations inside CAR and in neighbouring countries. While international forces led by the African Union and EU are playing an indispensable role in protecting civilians, insecurity persists and hinders the deployment of humanitarian aid workers. read more

Ohio State mens tennis indoor team national champions for 1st time in

The OSU men’s tennis team celebrates winning the ITA National Men’s Team Indoor Championship against USC Feb. 17 at the Met and the Galleria Tennis and Athletic Club. OSU won, 4-1.Courtesy of OSU athleticsAfter coming close each of the previous three seasons, the members of the Ohio State men’s tennis team can finally call themselves indoor champions.Playing in their fourth match against a ranked opponent in as many days, the No. 5 Buckeyes defeated No. 3 USC 4-1 Monday afternoon to claim the ITA Men’s Team Indoor Championship in Houston.Starting the match off strong for the Buckeyes, the No. 2-ranked duo of senior Peter Kobelt and redshirt-junior Kevin Metka defeated senior Ray Sarmiento and junior Yannick Hanfmann, 6-4.Redshirt-sophomore Chris Diaz and redshirt-freshman Ralf Steinbach then defeated junior Eric Johnson and sophomore Max de Vroome 6-4 to capture the doubles point for the Buckeyes. Diaz and Steinbach had not won a doubles match the whole weekend, but came up big when it mattered most.“We were able to set the tone early on and Steinbach and Diaz fought back with five straight points in doubles to get it started,” OSU coach Ty Tucker said after the win, according to a press release. “We rode Metka and Kobelt hard at No. 1 all weekend and they were able to win all of their matches for us.”Kobelt called earning the doubles point “huge.”“We didn’t get the first point against Virginia and we are a much better team when we win in doubles. I know I had to play at my best for us to win vs. USC,” Kobelt said, according to the release. “This trophy we are bringing back is for all the former members that have played at Ohio State. This is a great accomplishment.”Redshirt-junior Hunter Callahan and Kobelt set the pace in singles as both took on higher-ranked opponents, but did not yield.Callahan was off first after beating No. 47-ranked junior Johnny Wang 6-3, 6-4. Kobelt, ranked No. 23, followed suit defeating No. 7 Sarmiento by the same mark.Diaz lost to No. 16 Hanfmann 6-5 (7-4), 6-3 to give the Trojans one point, but Steinbach squashed any hope of a comeback by beating freshman Connor Farren 6-5 (7-4), 6-4 to clinch the championship for the Buckeyes.“To help the team clinch the match is an unbelievable feeling,” Steinbach said, according to the release. “I was up a set and playing good tennis then I realized after Peter won, I had a chance to serve for the title. I was a little nervous. The deciding point came down to a volley and I was aggressive at the net and was able to place a good shot for the clinching point.”It is the first indoor national title for the Buckeyes in program history, who had to defeat some of the nation’s best on the way.OSU took down No. 12 Florida, No. 10 Texas and No. 1 Virginia in consecutive days to set up its championship tilt with the Trojans (7-1).“When you beat two teams back-to-back that have been dominating college tennis the last five years, it’s a great accomplishment,” Tucker said in a released statement. “Everyone is playing for the team and the only thing that matters to these guys is that Ohio State wins.”At 13-0, this is the best start in program history, and with already one national championship in hand, expectations are likely to be sky high for the remainder of the season.The Buckeyes are next scheduled to play Notre Dame at South Bend, Ind. Saturday. First serve is set for noon. read more

Guyanas economy eroding at alarmingly fast rate

Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedMacroeconomic indicators point to a struggling economy- AliAugust 25, 2017In “Business”PAC Chairman warns of further tax losses for GovtJuly 9, 2017In “Politics”Irfaan Ali scolds Finance Minister Jordan over ‘fairy-tale’ excusesAugust 22, 2016In “Politics” – according to former Minister Irfaan Ali Even with increased production in the key traditional sectors, data compiled in the recent mid-year Finance Ministry Report has clearly showed that the economy is eroding at a fast rate.This is according to former Government Minister, Irfaan Ali, who said it therefore means that the local Guyanese economy could experience some challenges going forward.Ali pointed out that as foreign exchange tanked, imports will become relatively expensive. “Overall, imported goods would become relatively expensive, hence stoking inflation in the process,” he contended.Ali noted that net foreign reserve plummeted from US$633 million in June 2016 to US$574 million in mid-2017; the lowest ever recorded in over seven years.“In other words, the A Partnership for National Unity/Alliance For Change (APNU/AFC) Government destroyed in two years what the PPP/C [People’s Progressive Party] took to amass in 7 years. Even more worrisome, external debt increased by US$53 million to US$1,200 million,” he added.The Opposition Member of Parliament said it is also worthwhile to mention that net foreign revenue to external debt ratio had increased from 172 per cent in mid-2016 to 207 per cent in mid-2017.Opposition Leader Bharrat Jagdeo had also bashed the APNU/AFC coalition Government, saying that it remains clueless and hapless, even as the country’s economy continues on a downward spiral.Former Minister and PPP/C Member of Parliament,, Irfaan AliThe former President had also called out the Government for refusing to concede to advice and recommendations, which could in effect help to put the country back on the road to recovery.He accused the Administration of taking a laid back approach, while Guyanese continue to feel the brunt of a dilapidated economical structure.Under the PPP/C Administration, Guyana had the fastest growing economy in the region. And from 2006 to 2014, Guyana’s economy experienced continuous, positive growth. This was the longest period of uninterrupted growth in the history of Guyana. The average growth rate was 4.5 per cent per annum.In 2014, the last full year of the PPP/C in office, Guyana’s GDP was US$3.1 billion. That was up from US$1.4 billion in 2006, an increase of 121.4 per cent. The country’s Gross International Reserve held at the Bank of Guyana at the end of 2014 was US$665.6 million, which was equivalent to 3.6 months of imports. It was up from US$251.4 million in 2005, an increase of 164.76 per cent.The PPP/C administration had drastically reduced the huge debt it had inherited from a previous PNC regime. And the PPP/C reduced the external debt to just 39.5% of GDP. That was also a reduction from 2006 when the debt to GDP was 71.8 percent. This has been described as a good demonstration of the prudent financial management by the PPP/C and the dynamic growth of the economy.In this year’s mid-year report, it was stated that the overall balance of payment recorded a deficit of US$46 million during the first half of 2017. According to the report, key traditional products such as sugar, timber, rice and even gold have all recorded a decline in export earnings from US$518.7 million in mid-2017 to US$503.5 million in 2016 during similar period.At the end of the reporting period, exports stood at US$685.1 million and imports at US$808.9 million. To offset this enormous deficit, Government turned their attention to the Bank of Guyana net foreign assets, where US$18.3 million was expended. read more

Wealth Files NI 43101 report on Atacama lithium project

first_imgWealth Minerals has filed on SEDAR a NI 43-101 technical report titled NI 43-101 Technical Report on the Atacama Lithium Project El Loa Province Region II Republic of Chile dated March 10, 2017, in connection with the grant to Wealth of an option to acquire a 100% royalty-free interest in and to the ‘Proyecto Atacama Lithium.’“The Report provides an independent assessment of Wealth’s lithium brine exploration model and comprehensive recommendations for upcoming exploration and project evaluation,” stated Henk van Alphen, Wealth’s CEO. “The Salar de Atacama is the only salar in South America where lithium is recovered using conventional evaporation techniques and it hosts approximately 15% of global lithium resources. We are currently applying for permits to move forward with our exploration plans through the remainder of 2017.”“The Report outlines the prospective nature of the company’s land position in the Salar de Atacama and the exploration steps necessary to test the model that lithium-bearing brines exist at depth,” explained Tim McCutcheon, the company’s President. “Despite being contiguous with existing production facilities, the northern portion of the salar has never before been explored for lithium brine potential, despite the geology and hydrogeology being similar to producing areas.”The project consists of 144 exploration concessions comprising 46,200 ha in the Salar de Atacama, 220 km east of the northern Chilean city of Antofagasta. It lies about 30km north of the Soquem Quimica y Minera de Chile (SQM) potassium-lithium operation, and about 50 km north of Rockwood Holdings (the Albermarle Corp’s business unit in Chile). Both SQM and Rockwood produce potassium and lithium from brines at depth in the Salar de Atacama.last_img read more

Strikes shut down Egyptian port city for second day

first_imgHUNDREDS OF ANTI-government protesters have blocked central roads and work was halted for a second day in Egypt’s restive coastal city of Port Said, the site of an unprecedented soccer massacre in 2012.The protesters are angry over the killing of some 50 people during demonstrations last month against the death sentences for 21 people, mostly fans of the city’s soccer club Al-Masry, for their part in the February of last year, stadium violence that killed 74.Many Egyptians believe last year’s deadly stadium riots in Port Said were orchestrated either by the police or by Mubarak supporters, and any verdict was likely to trigger a highly charged response.As part of a partial general strike under way in Port Said, local government employees, port customs and small businesses were shut today. The city’s army-guarded university and banks remained open.Port Said sits on the northern tip of the Suez Canal but the strikes have not disrupted shipping in the international waterway.Read: Egypt: 31 dead after football riot verdict>last_img read more

The Exorcist could be this seasons scariest series

first_imgIt’s a season full of TV remakes, and so far, they’ve been all over the map. One turned out way better than it had any right to be (Lethal Weapon), while another somehow failed to live up to even the lowest expectations (MacGyver). So where on the spectrum does FOX’s TV adaptation of The Exorcist fall? While it isn’t without its flaws, it is thankfully closer to the Lethal Weapon side of the scale.When The Exorcist came out in 1973, it was widely considered the scariest movie of all time. It’s gruesome practical effects, grim atmosphere, and subliminal imagery created a terrifying experience that still holds up all these years later. You can imagine then, that adapting that to the small screen was no easy task. Fortunately for all involved, the new series mostly pulls it off.Promo image from FOX’s The Exorcist. (Photo via FOX)Rather than doing a straight remake and pulling the original characters into 2016, changes the setting and characters while remaining in the same world. That is one where demons routinely possess people. The story follows Father Tomas Ortega, a young, struggling priest in Chicago played by Alfonso Herrera. He forms a friendship with Angela Rance (Geena Davis) who is dealing with the fact that her husband, Henry (Alan Ruck) is rapidly losing himself to dementia. Her daughter Casey has also returned home from college, blaming herself for the death of a friend. Things aren’t going well for the Rance family.To top it off, Angela is convinced a demon is attacking her house. Things are being mysteriously moved around the house, and creepy voices emanate from the walls. Father Tomas doesn’t believe it until he has a series of recurring dreams where he sees a priest in Mexico named Father Marcus to perform an unsuccessful exorcism on a young boy. When an oddly lucid Henry tells him where to find Marcus, Tomas is convinced.The Exorcist absolutely nails its atmosphere. From the very opening scene, the new series perfectly captures the feel of the original movie. A building sense of dread pervades every scene. That’s partly thanks to the subtle, creepy score and partly thanks to the cast. Every actor gives a fantastic performance here. Especially Geena Davis, who in every scene barely hanging on to any semblance of control she can while her family is falling apart around her.Father Marcus (Ben Daniels) tries to perform an exorcism on a young boy. (Photo: Screenshot via FOX)There is no shortage of disturbing imagery here, either. From the face of the possessed boy in Mexico to the eyes of a much-too-friendly priest Father Tomas comes across, there were quite a few images that stuck with me long after the episode ended.Unfortunately, while there are some good, disturbing effects at work in this episode, there’s a lot of really bad CGI. While the original movie used practical effects that still look good, the TV show’s computer generated ones look dated even now. Some scenes look like they fell out of some long-cancelled Exorcist video game.It also has the same problem that plagues every show that tries to squeeze a two-hour movie into 40 minutes. Much of the build-up that made the movie so scary had to be sacrificed in the transition. Since they can’t go an entire pilot episode without a demonic possession, they rush through a few moments, leading to a somewhat poorly paced episode.It also led to one of the most baffling decisions of the episode. During one scene, Angela comes to Father Tomas to ask if he could check her house for demons. He initially brushes her off, but she convinces him to talk to her family. Since apparently, the producers didn’t want to go to commercial without some kind of jump scare, a crow flies through Tomas’s office window, impales itself on the broken glass and dies a slow, graphic and poorly animated death. It wasn’t scary, it wasn’t even disturbing, and even the show forgets about it as soon as the next scene begins.The CGI in The Exorcist could be improved. Or better yet, removed. (Photo: Screenshot via FOX)Thankfully, at least for now, the show’s atmosphere makes up for its flaws. The Exorcist has a ton of potential and now it’s up to them to make the most of it. The pilot ensured plenty of places for this series to go and I’m really looking forward to being scared out of my mind every Friday night. That is if the series can deliver.I’ll say one thing for it right now, though. Ending the episode with the possessed Casey smiling down at Father Tomas while the original music from 1973 kicks in was a brilliant move, and possibly the show’s creepiest moment. That music gives me chills every time.last_img read more

Sweden players deserve Golden Ball

first_imgSweden have lost out of the quarter-final in the 2018 World Cup in Russia after a 2-0 loss to England but Zlatan Ibrahimovic believes Sweden’s players all deserve to be given a Golden Ball award for their performance so far at the World Cup.Sweden performed beyond expectations and even without the services of Ibrahimovic, who was impressed with Janne Andersson’s side. Every player should get a golden ball in Sweden. What they did will be remembered forever. Thank you for the show pic.twitter.com/VsoaUY6W99— Zlatan Ibrahimović (@Ibra_official) July 7, 2018“Every player should get a Golden Ball in Sweden,” Ibrahimovic wrote on Twitter.“What they did will be remembered forever. Thank you for the show.”Ibrahimovic lost a bet with another former United player, David Beckham, and he will now have to watch an England game at Wembley with the ex-LA Galaxy star.Jadon Sancho, Borussia DortmundCrouch: Liverpool could beat Man United to Jadon Sancho Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Peter Crouch wouldn’t be surprised to see Jadon Sancho end up at Liverpool one day instead of his long-term pursuers Manchester United.In the bet, Beckham had promised to buy Ibrahimovic whatever he wanted from IKEA if Sweden won England in Samara. Zlatan Ibrahimovic lost the bet!It looks like he’s heading to Wembley with David Beckham.Get the #ENG shirt on order.The fish and chips can probably wait, though…??#SWE #SWEENG #WorldCup pic.twitter.com/bLImKr8Rkb— Omnisport (@OmnisportNews) July 7, 2018last_img read more

ASA Pushes for National Labeling Standard

first_imgThe American Soybean Association (ASA) stressed support of a consistent, science based national food labeling act in a letter to the U.S. House of Representatives on Tuesday.In the letter, ASA and more than 370 organizations supported the Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act, bipartisan legislation introduced by Reps. Mike Pompeo (R-KS) and G.K. Butterfield (D-NC) that would ensure food labeling in the United States is uniform.“Today interest groups across the country are pushing state-level labeling mandates that will exacerbate consumer confusion and drive up food prices. Instead of informing consumers, these state initiatives are filled with loopholes, exempting as much as two-thirds of foods,” the letter states. “The result will be higher food prices for hard working American families.”  ASA and other agricultural organizations underscore that GMOs have been an important part of the nation’s food supply for the past 20 years and that leading health and regulatory organizations, from the World Health Organization to the American Medical Association, have all concluded GMOs are safe.“The Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act will give consumers, farmers, and small businesses certainty. The proposed legislation also would improve clarity for foods carrying a GMO-free label and provide uniform rules by creating a national certification program for foods that have been produced without bioengineering,” the groups state in the letter.ASA strongly encourages House members to cosponsor H.R. 1599 and to support its adoption.Click here to read the entire letter.last_img read more

Coal hearing draws hundreds at Clark College

first_imgFollow the story on The Columbian’s Storify page. It wasn’t the biggest crowd to talk coal in recent weeks, but about 650 people were good enough to fill two venues during a Vancouver public hearing at Clark College on Wednesday.Advocates turned out in droves to weigh in on one of several proposed export terminals that could boost the amount of coal being shipped through the Northwest. About 400 people packed a Gaiser Hall auditorium for the three-hour hearing, with another 250 filling nearby Foster Auditorium at the same time.The meeting centered around the proposed Gateway Pacific Terminal at Cherry Point near Bellingham, one of five coal export facilities now on the table in Washington and Oregon. Among other commodities, the facility would handle coal that’s brought in mostly by rail, on its way to energy-hungry markets in Asia. One of the Northwest’s key rail arterials is the BNSF Railway track that passes through the Columbia River Gorge and Washougal, Camas and Vancouver.Speakers, chosen by random drawings, mostly echoed familiar arguments. Opponents decried the environmental harm of shipping and burning coal, plus the increased trains it would take to move it. Supporters touted the economic benefits of the Gateway Pacific facility, calling it an opportunity for a region that needs jobs badly.But opponents of coal exports, many clad in red shirts, appeared to far outnumber those who want the Cherry Point facility to move forward.last_img read more

Tropical storm warning issued for North Carolina

first_imgCHARLESTON, S.C. — Along much of the East Coast, hotel owners, tourism officials and would-be vacationers kept a watchful eye on forecasts Wednesday as Tropical Storm Arthur churned off Florida, threatening Fourth of July plans for thousands of people. A tropical storm warning was issued for parts of North Carolina as the first named storm of the season was expected to strengthen to a hurricane and skim the Outer Banks, a string of narrow barrier islands prone to flooding but popular for beachgoers, as a Category 1 hurricane Friday.Wednesday’s warning stretched across the entire North Carolina coast, from Little River Inlet near South Carolina north to the Virginia border. A tropical storm watch for Florida’s east coast was canceled. The worst of the storm should occur at Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, about dawn Friday, with 3 to 5 inches of rain and sustained winds up to 85 mph, said Tony Saavedra, a meteorologist at the National Weather Service. The storm should move through quickly and be off the coast of New England later in the day, perhaps making landfall in Canada’s maritime provinces as a tropical storm, he said.The motel Shutters on the Banks in Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina, was completely booked for the holiday weekend, general manager John Zeller said Tuesday, but he was considering waiving cancellation fees if the storm continued to track toward the area. “We have received some cancellations but not too many,” he said. “Basically we are telling people to kind of wait and see what happens. … I think everybody is kind of watching the weather.”last_img read more

Wont stoop low even to deny allegations CJI Ranjan Gogoi

first_imgChief Justice of India Ranjan GogoiIANSChief Justice of India Ranjan Gogoi was accused of sexual harassment by a former court staff member on Friday, April 19, in an affidavit.The 35-year-old woman submitted the affidavit to the respective residences of 22 judges of the Supreme Court, in which she alleged that the current Chief Justice was inappropriate with her, and had her removed from her post when she did not reciprocate. The incidents occurred in October 2018.The woman mentioned separate incidents where she allegedly encountered the CJI when she was working at his residential office. In an exclusive carried by The Quint, a senior lawyer said, “Her entire family has been harassed, victimised and intimidated. Thereafter false criminal cases have been lodged against her. So there is relentless intimidation and victimisation that is going on not just to silence her but to also punish her. She has narrated everything supported by documents.”Replying to the allegations levelled against him, the CJI said in a statement that he would not stoop so low to even deny the charges and that less than 10 hours were given to him to make a statement. In his statement, Gogoi replied, “I don’t think that this can be of a plot of a junior assistant. There is a bigger plot. They want to deactivate the office of the CJI. Independence of judiciary is under very very serious threat. If the judges have to work under these conditions, good people will never come to this office.” According to Bar and Bench, he asserted, “I will sit on this Bench and discharge my duties without fear and favour till my tenure is over.”The Chief Justice then defended himself to the “citizens of the country and stating that this pillar of democracy is “under serious threat” but he will continue working. He also added, “They cannot catch me on money, so they have brought up this. This is the reward a CJI gets after 20 years and a bank balance of Rs 680000. Independence of judiciary under very very serious threat. I had to tell this from the judicial seat.”Tushar Mehta, the Solicitor General of India, said that the matter should be “taken very very seriously”. The Supreme Court held an emergency hearing on the morning of April 20, Saturday after the sexual assault charges were levelled against Gogoi. A notice was issued by the top court reading, “Take notice that a special bench consisting of the Hon’ble chief justice of India, Hon’ble Mr Justice Arun Mishra and Hon’ble Mr Justice Sanjiv Khanna is being constituted to have a special sitting at 10:30 AM today i.e. the 20th April 2019 in the Chief Justice’s court to deal with a matter of great public importance touching upon the independence of judiciary, on a mention being made by Shri Tushar Mehta, Ld. Solicitor General.”last_img read more

European Parliament concerned at state of human rights in Bangladesh

first_imgEuropean Parliament concerned at state of human rights in BangladeshThe coming election in Bangladesh poses as the country’s last chance to determine the course of its democracy and rule of law. However, abuse of power and the crackdown on the media, human rights activists, critics of the government, lawyers and the civil society, as well as extrajudicial killings, enforced disappearances and abductions are a cause of concern.These views were expressed at the debate on Bangladesh’s human rights situation held at the European Parliament on Thursday in Strasbourg, France. A draft resolution was adopted at the end of the debate by the parliament members, calling upon all political parties in Bangladesh to take part in the election. They also called for an amendment of the digital security act.During the discussion, Austrian politician Josef Weidenholzer said that the election to be held at the end of the year in Bangladesh was important for the country. If the situation deteriorated, this would have an impact on Europe too. He highlighted the escalating oppression and repression of civil society, political activists and human rights activists in Bangladesh, also mentioning that there were reports of extrajudicial killings, mass arrests and enforced disappearances. The media too was under threat, he said.Weidenholzer said that opposition leader and BNP chairperson Khaleda Zia would not be able to contest in the coming election and that the party supporters maintained that she was imprisoned in politically motivated cases filed against her. He called upon the Bangladesh government to create an environment conducive to the election, where people could express their views freely and cast their votes in free and fair polls.British politician and member of the European Parliament Charles Tannock said that there was development in many sectors in Bangladesh, but the state of human rights was deteriorating, as was evident in the arrest of photographer Shahidul Alam.British politician Sajjad Karim said, there was a lot to be done for the improvement of democracy and human rights in Bangladesh.Another speaker said that if the coming election was not inclusive and peaceful, Bangladesh’s democratic continuity would be hampered.The people and the government of Bangladesh were lauded for their constructive role in accepting Rohingya refugees from neighbouring Myanmar. However, it was also said that the repatriation of the refugees should only take place in conditions for a safe, dignified and voluntary return.EEU commissioner for humanitarian aid and crisis management Christos Stylianides said that EEU had long been expressing concern about Bangladesh human rights situation. Journalists and students in Bangladesh were under attack. The digital security act curbed the freedom of expression and freedom of the press. He called for a transparent, neutral and inclusive election and also called upon the government to ensure a safe environment for the polls.At the end of the debate, the European Parliament drew up a draft resolution regarding Bangladesh, expressing serious concern about human rights in the country, including the crackdown against media, students, human rights activists and the political opposition. It called upon the media to conduct independent investigations into reports of extrajudicial killings, enforced disappearances and excessive force, including the disappearance of former ambassador Maroof Zaman and Mir Ahmad Bin Quasem.The draft resolution called for the immediate release of photographer Shahidul Alam, amendment of the digital security act, abolition the death sentence, reforming the labour laws, removing the clause allowing marriage under 18 in ‘special circumstances’, ensuring safe and dignified repatriation of Rohingyas, identifying challenges to human rights and resolving these challenges.last_img read more

Ronnie Floyd megachurch pastor and Trump adviser nominated for key SBC post

first_img How Hind Makki is changing the conversation around women’s inclusion in mosques Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email We are not all the same, and in our difference we are divine August 30, 2019 Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.,NIH Director Francis Collins on why Christians must reconcile with science Columns • Opinion • Simran Jeet Singh: Articles of Faith Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,About the authorView All Posts Share This! By: Bob Smietana @bobsmietana Bob Smietana @bobsmietana Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,(RNS) —  Former Southern Baptist Convention President Ronnie Floyd has been nominated to lead the denomination’s Executive Committee, based in Nashville, Tenn.An Arkansas megachurch pastor who serves as part of President Trump’s unofficial group of faith advisers, Floyd would succeed former Executive Committee President Frank Page, who resigned last year due to an “inappropriate relationship,” according to the denomination’s official news service.A vote on Floyd’s nomination is scheduled for Tuesday at a meeting of the Executive Committee in Dallas. That group of about 80 Southern Baptist leaders, along with its Nashville-based staff, acts on behalf of the convention in between its annual meetings.“We firmly believe he is the man God has uniquely prepared and gifted to lead our Executive Committee at this challenging time in our nation’s and our denomination’s history,” Steve Swofford, chairman of the presidential search committee, wrote in a letter announcing Floyd’s nomination on Sunday (March 31), according to Baptist Press.Floyd was president of the Southern Baptist Convention from 2014 to 2016. He also served as chair of the Executive Committee in the mid-1990s. He is currently president of the National Day of Prayer Task Force.Ronnie Floyd. Photo courtesy of SBCDuring his three decades as pastor of Cross Church, which has campuses in Arkansas and Missouri, the congregation has baptized more than 22,000 people, according to a biography posted on the Southern Baptist Convention Executive Committee website. The congregation claims more than 9,000 attendees and reports that it has given more than $1 million annually to the denomination’s Cooperative Program — which mainly funds mission work and seminary education — since 2015.As SBC president during the 2016 presidential race, Floyd expressed concerns about then-candidate Trump’s comments about women and minorities but met with him, saying it was important for religious leaders to meet with candidates. Floyd also told the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette that he led a prayer for President Trump during a 2017 meeting at the White House.“I prayed for protection for the president and the vice president because we live in a very difficult day in our country. I prayed for God to lead them and for them to rely on the Lord for strength and for wisdom,” he said.Floyd’s nomination comes at a tumultuous time for the SBC.Recent news reports have detailed alleged abuse at Southern Baptist churches. J.D. Greear, the current SBC president, has called on the convention to investigate churches that have covered up abuse. Some Executive Committee members have urged caution before investigating churches.The topic of abuse and a proposed amendment to the SBC’s constitution that would allow the denomination to remove churches that show clear “indifference to addressing the crime of sexual abuse” will be discussed at the SBC’s annual meeting in June.A previous version of this story had the incorrect spelling of Steve Swofford’s name. RNS regrets the error.  Share This! Share This! Anti-extremism program won’t stop hate, say Muslims who’ve seen its flaws August 30, 2019center_img Share This! Opinion News By: Bob Smietana @bobsmietana Bob Smietana Bob Smietana is a veteran religion writer and editor-in-chief of Religion News Service.,Add Comment Click here to post a comment Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email By: Bob Smietana @bobsmietana TagsDonald Trump homepage featured Ronnie Floyd SBC SBC Executive Committee Southern Baptists,You may also like Share This! By their tweets you will know them: The Democrats’ continuing God gap August 30, 2019last_img read more

Flame Con Year Three Cosplay Creators Comics

first_img Photos: Best Cosplay at San Diego Comic-Con 2019Photos: Best Cosplay From Anime NYC 2018 Stay on target This past weekend was the third annual Flame Con, an LGBT focused comics and pop culture convention in Brooklyn, NY. The con is run by Geeks OUT, a national LGBT geek organization.The past two years the convention has been held at the New York Marriott at the Brooklyn Bridge which is by quite a few trains making it easy to get to. There’s also a Panera Bread and a food truck right outside for all your coffee needs! Some great food options too like Rocco’s Tacos and Hill Country Chicken. While I am a fan of Hill Country Chicken, they ran out of biscuits the first day then breasts and thighs the second. What gives!?Okay, back to talking about the actual convention. It starts off at noon each day, which is later than most conventions, but it works here. The convention highlights some of the biggest LGBT names in comics like James Tynion IV, Kate Leth, Steve Orlando, Phil Jimenez, and Mags Visaggio. The rest is filled with some lesser known names, allies, small publishers like Margins Publishing, and some vendors with novelties and knick-knacks. Their big media guest this year was Robin Lord Taylor who’s a great get and looked like he was having a ball all weekend. You won’t find much regarding back issue vendors with deals to be had, CGC staff, or old school comics collectors with their short boxes are carts trying to dump a hundred or so issues of comics for one creator to sign. What you will find are lots of eager artists with gorgeous prints and personal projects that you’d find at MoCCA Fest and the quality cosplay you’d find at NYCC. For many, it’s the best of both worlds in the New York Con scene. If you’re a vendor, you really do need to know your audience for this. The crowd skews young and queer. The nineties flare comic stuff doesn’t go over as well as Steven Universe, Pokemon, and Sailor Moon. This is not your standard comics show and needs extra attention.The best thing about Flame Con is how welcoming it is. They provide attendees with preferred pronoun stickers, gender neutral restrooms, and everyone is very friendly. It’s easily the most pleasant con experience overall during the year. If you haven’t checked out Flame Con yet, please mark it on your calendar for next year, presumably the third weekend in August of 2018. Attendance keeps going up though so they may need a bigger venue next year!Photos by Betty FelonView as: One Page Slides1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. Let us know what you like about Geek by taking our survey.last_img read more

Three dead sea turtles discovered in Isla Mujeres

first_imgHe explained that according to the information collected, the turtles were injured by the propellers of large transport vessels and not by small boats, since the shells were halved.Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window) Deline García Canto from the marine turtle protection program explained that three adult sea turtles have been found dead near Punta Sam, all showing signs of propeller injuries. He says that due to the extensiveness of the propeller damage, all three sea turtles were mostlikely hit by larger boats rather than smaller ones. The turtles “were practically split in half,” he said adding that “a small boat could not have done damage as serious as these turtles had,” he said.center_img Isla Mujeres, Q.R. — Only days into the sea turtle season, three have already been found deceased in the Isla Mujeres municipality. last_img read more

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first_imgVideos | March 22, 2011 Fluke – Dose Detectors AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Technology Reports View all 9 items Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Information Technology View all 220 items Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Conference Coverage View all 396 items Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Recent Videos View all 606 items Find more news and videos from AAPM. Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019.center_img Women’s Health View all 62 items Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Find more SCCT news and videos Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more SCCT news and videos Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Find more SCCT news and videos Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Find more SCCT news and videos Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. The Fluke Biomedical TNT 12000 X-Ray Test Device help measure radiation dose output from X-ray emitting radiology devices. This compact, totally-wireless device features simultaneous all-in-one exposure measurement, including half-value layer, and choice of custom readout device or laptop communication with dedicated Zigbee interface for fast and secure results display and archiving. The system helps reduce the time required to take measurements because of its ease of use and fast speed. The systems also help imaging facilities meet regulatory requirements. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Find more SCCT news and videos Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities.last_img read more

Why functional programming in Python matters Interview with best selling author Steven

first_imgPython is currently one of the most popular and desired programming languages. Primarily for its simplicity, agility and ability to be used across a variety of software development projects. Although an Object Oriented language, Python supports an array of programming paradigms, including Functional Programming. Functional Programming is a paradigm that treats computation as the evaluation of math functions. It’s quite advantageous as it allows for efficient parallel programming and error-free code. We recently interviewed Steven Lott, a true Python professional and best-selling author of a number of Python books. Steven talks a bit about modern Python and how the language adapts well to the Functional paradigm, offering developers a range of solutions to build modern, cloud based applications. He also talks about his most recent book, the second edition of his best seller, Functional Python Programming, and how it will benefit developers looking to enter the world of functional programming with Python. About Steven Steven F. Lott has been programming since the 70s, when computers were large, expensive, and rare. As a contract software developer and architect, he has worked on hundreds of projects, from very small to very large. He’s been using Python to solve business problems for over 10 years. Steven is a technomad who lives in various places on the east coast of the U.S. Follow his technology blog to stay updated on the latest trends in tech. You may also connect with him on LinkedIn. Key Takeaways Why learn Python? One of the major reasons developers appreciate Python, is because it’s simple, and has the ability to create succinct and expressive programs. For example, data scientists prefer Python because they can build sophisticated analytical tools using simple functions and produce useful results. Why Functional programming? The functional programming paradigm forms the perfect foundation for developers and architects to build and design modern architectures like Serverless. But Python isn’t inherently functional. Although an object oriented language at heart, Python can create higher order functions and other functional features. Python 3 has made this easier. Steven’s Python 4 wish list: In future versions of Python, Steven hopes to see a wider use of Unicode operator characters like × in addition, * for multiplication, and ÷ in addition to / for division. Also, he expects PyPy and RPython projects to be more widely used; future Pythons versions will benefit from optimizations and restructuring the interpreter. One of the most helpful features of Python 3 are type hints, which allow one to write clear and implicitly documented code while preventing the invoking of methods with wrong data types. Steven’s latest edition of Functional programming with Python, explores type hints in depth along with core language features such as lambdas, generator expressions, functions, and callable objects. Full Interview Python is one of the top programming languages. List down top 3 features of Python that make programmers love it.. It seems like programmers love Python primarily because it allows them to create succinct, expressive programs. Before long, they learn the vast library of code – is another reason for Python’s immense popularity. Many people adopt Python because of the low barrier to entry: it really is as simple as download and start working. You’ve been working with Python for over a decade. How has your experience been with Python as a primary development language? Over my 40-year career, I’ve used a variety of languages. And I’ve found Python to be extremely productive. A team can build and deploy microservices-based applications at a tremendous pace. Data scientists can build sophisticated analytical tools using simple functions to produce useful results without the overheads of complex compile and build environments. Back when Python 3 just came into existence, we saw certain resistance to the notion of Python being apt for functional programming. How would you say Python has progressed since then? At its core, Python is an object-oriented language. Consequently some functional features aren’t central. One of the essential functional design tools — creating higher-order functions — has always been part of Python. The wider use of generator functions in Python 3 has made functional Python programming much more common. Many Python applications are hybrids, mixing object-oriented and functional features of the language. Now that type hints are available, it becomes practical to use mypy to confirm that the code is very likely to work properly. For a developer who’s picking up the Functional Programming paradigm for the first time, what do you think are the prerequisites? Functional programming is closely aligned to the core mathematical ideas of functions and functional composition. As a consequence, a minimal background in programming could be advantageous to help leverage essential function definitions and avoid needless state change. For programmers already heavily invested in procedural programming, it may be helpful to set the idea of stateful objects aside. In the above context, how does your book, Functional Python Programming, Second Edition, prepare its readers to be industry ready? What are the key takeaways for readers from your title and how does it help with the learning curve? The examples in the book are related to exploratory data analysis, an important skill in the broader area of data science. They also focus on the standard library, allowing someone to apply the functional design approach to other libraries and tools. I think a focus on the core language features (e.g., lambdas, generator expressions, functions, callable objects) provide a foundation that allows a programmer to apply the core ideas more widely to different kinds of problems and other software packages. What new and updated content is available in this edition, for developers who’ve purchased your previous book? Almost all of the examples have been rewritten to include type hints. This can be an important quality check helping to ensure the Python code works. When used with doctest examples, it becomes relatively easy to provide reliable, correct code. In a few cases, external packages (i.e., the pymonad library) don’t have type hints and the examples reflect this gap. Can you throw some light on Functional Reactive Programming and how FRP with Python is boosting the implementation of modern architectures like Cloud Native and Serverless? The central idea of serverless programming — a collection of isolated functions — fits the functional programming paradigm very elegantly. The processing is generally stateless, with stand-alone functions waiting for their inputs. Ideas like “choreography” of web services work with this idea of stateless functions that respond to an input by producing an output. This leads to careful separation of persistence and state change from the other transformational processing. This helps create software with easy-to-understand behavior and implementation code that’s very expressive of the algorithm. As Python inches towards a 4.0, what do you think should/can be changed/rectified in the language, for the better? At some point, I expect the PyPy and RPython projects to create some optimizations leading to a fundamental restructuring of the interpreter. Perhaps these changes could remove the need for the GIL (Global Interpreter Lock) by exposing a minimal kernel of code that requires exclusive access to internal data structures. Of more general interest, I’d hope to see wider use of Unicode operator characters like × in addition to * for multiplication, and ÷ in addition to / for division. Perhaps ∻ could be adopted for truncated division. This could also lead to use of ℝ instead of float and ℤ instead of int providing a more mathematical look to type hints. It would be nice to expand the use of the Unicode character set to create more readable programs. List down 3 reasons for developers to choose your book as the book of choice for Functional programming in Python. Programmers who want to create succinct and expressive code often find functional design to help them fulfill this. The Functional Python Programming book provides extensive examples that show multiple ways to achieve this goal. In many cases, generator functions and lazy processing can be a large performance improvement. A generator function can use less memory than a large data collection, and this change can be helpful. This book will provide number of examples of lazy processing to avoid creating large, in-memory collections. It can be difficult to get started with type hints. The use case in this book show type hints in somewhat more complex real-world situations. If you enjoyed this interview, head over to check out Steven’s latest edition of Functional Python Programming, He is leveraging Python to implement microservices and ETL pipelines. His other titles with Packt Publishing include Python Essentials, Mastering Object-Oriented Python, Functional Python Programming, and Python for Secret Agents. Read Next: What is the difference between functional and object oriented programming? Building functional programs with F# Seven wrongs don’t make the one right: Solving a problem with Functional Javascriptlast_img read more

Costa Rican immigration officials detained released by Nicaragua

first_imgRelated posts:Nicaraguan-Costa Rican journalist Lucía Pineda jailed and accused of inciting terrorism in Nicaragua Music and migration: The struggles of Ceshia Ubau Nicaragua govt agrees to prisoner release to restart opposition talks La Prensa: Daniel Ortega imposes repression, misery on Nicaraguans Thanks for reading The Tico Times. We strive to keep you up to date about everything that’s been happening in Costa Rica. We work hard to keep our reporting independent and groundbreaking, but we need your help. The Tico Times is partly funded by you and every little bit helps. If all our readers chipped in a buck a month we’d be set for years. Support the Tico Times Facebook Comments A potentially tense international situation was resolved amicably Monday evening after two Costa Rican Immigration Administration officials were apparently detained by the Nicaraguan army.According to Costa Rica’s Ministry of Public Security (MSP), the officials had been carrying out work in a government vehicle Monday afternoon when they were stopped near the Upala canton, which borders Nicaragua. Following diplomatic communications, the pair were returned safely to Costa Rica that night.“After positive coordination [between Nicaragua and the Ministry of Public Security], at 8 p.m. exactly, they were liberated and returned to our territory,” said Michael Soto, the Minister of Public Security. “They are in perfect health and had no other inconveniences.“It was an assertive and positive communication with Nicaraguan authorities to prevent the incident from escalating.”Per the MSP, the Costa Rican Immigration Administration officials had turned away a Nicaraguan citizen near the border prior to their detainment. They had been “proper in their actions,” according to a press release.However, the officials may have entered Nicaraguan territory, though the MSP says that is “still being investigated.”According to the United Nations Refugee Agency, at least 20,000 Nicaraguans have sought asylum in Costa Rica since April as citizens of that country flee political tensions and human-rights violations.For more, read “Fleeing Nicaragua,” The Tico Times’ three-part series on Nicaraguan refugees:center_img Fleeing Nicaragua: The escapelast_img read more