Tag Archives: Brenda

Find Your Inner Southern Gentleman on National Seersucker Day

first_img 14 Scandinavian Clothing Brands You Need to Know Why Your Desk Chair Matters and the 9 Best Ones to Boost Your Productivity Celebrating 110 Years of Seersucker: Happy Birthday to the Perfect Summer Suit The Best Straw Hats to Keep You Looking Classy Get to Know Alto Adige, the Northern Italian Wine Region Editors’ Recommendations The seersucker suit is, without a doubt, one of the brightest sartorial gems of the 20th century; if you don’t already have a seersucker suit hanging in your closet, this could be the year that you embrace this Southern masterpiece. Haspel — the men’s clothing brand that invented the seersucker suit in 1909 — has declared Thursday, June 11th to be National Seersucker Day.The puckered cotton fabric known as seersucker was first developed in India sometime in the 19th century. The tough yet breathable material was ideal for laboring in hot temperatures. Seersucker eventually made its way stateside, where Haspel founder Joseph Haspel Sr adapted the fabric into a suit near the turn of the century. His goal? To help Southern men look fly without melting in the New Orleans heat. “Fly” may not have been the right word at the time, but you get the idea.Related: Meet Up Mondays: Sam Shipley and Jeff Halmos for HaspelOver the next century, the breathable fabric, light color, and slimming vertical stripes would make summers more comfortable and stylish for gentlemen. The seersucker suit became the anti-pinstripe — something meant for distinguished men of leisure rather than high-powered soul-crushers of industry.Don’t take our word for it; take a look at these gentlemen from the past and make up your own mind as to whether the seersucker suit is for you.Robert Redford in The Moment of Fear (1960)Gregory Peck in To Kill a Mockingbird (1962)Say what you will about former U.S. Senator Trent Lott’s politics, he had the right idea when he initiated Seersucker Thursday back in 1996. Though the practice took a brief hiatus after 2012, it’s back, baby — and this year, the soft, breathable fabric will extend far beyond the Capital.WASHINGTON, DC – JUNE 11: Rep. Bill Cassidy, R-La., (C) hosts “National Seersucker Day” with members of the U.S. Congress at U.S. Capitol on June 11, 2014. (Photo by Paul Morigi/Getty Images for Haspel)How can you observe National Seersucker Day? All you have to do is don one of these stylish suits yourself. Lots of brands make seersucker suits these days, but if you’re looking to rock an 100% American seersucker suit that’s made by the masters, we recommend that you visit a Haspel retailer near you. Mint Juleps are optional, but encouraged.The seersucker suits are also available on the Haspel website.last_img read more

Tuesdays Daily Brief Disability inclusion minimum wage and LGBTI rights in Botswana

Security Council members issued a statement on Monday offering “their full support” to the UN Special Envoy for Yemen, Martin Griffiths, after he had reportedly come in for criticism by the Government.A fragile ceasefire has largely held in and around the crucial port city of Hudaydah since the signing of the historic Stockholm Agreement last December, seen as crucial first move to brokering a lasting peace between rebel Houthis, and the Saudi-led coalition backing the Government.Find out more here. Families deserve answers when loved ones go missing in conflict: Security Council adopts historic resolution New Disability Inclusion Strategy is ‘transformative change we need’, says Guterres The 15 members of the United Nations Security Council adopted on Tuesday the very first ever resolution focused on the issue of missing persons in armed conflict. The aim is to encourage countries to fulfil their obligations, take action to step up prevention, and tackle the issue earlier, so that ultimately families separated by conflict can be reunited, or at least given answers as to the fate of their loved ones.“Alarming numbers of persons go missing in armed conflict,” said Reena Ghelani, who heads operations and advocacy at the UN’s humanitarian coordination office, OCHA, and was briefing on behalf of UN relief chief Mark Lowcock.Learn why this is a major win for thousands of war-torn families.UN human rights chief Bachelet hails Botswana decision decriminalizing same-sex relationships Disability inclusion is not only a fundamental human right, it is “central to the promise” of the 2030 Agenda on Sustainable Development, UN Secretary-General António Guterres told the annual conference on the Convention of Rights of Persons with Disabilities, which began on Tuesday.“When we fight to secure those rights, we move our world closer to upholding the core values and principles of the United Nations Charter”, he explained. “When we remove policies or biases or obstacles to opportunity for persons with disabilities, the whole world benefits”.Read our full story here. Macron leads EU-wide minimum wage call as Merkel, Medvedev warn of global injustice  “Fundamental change” to the world of work – including an EU-wide minimum wage – is needed to address the growing gap between society’s haves and have-nots, French President Emmanuel Macron said on Tuesday. In a 45-minute speech at the International Labour Organization’s Centenary conference in Geneva, Mr. Macron insisted that the accumulation of wealth in the hands of the few from globalization had created a “law of the jungle”, which had opened the door to damaging nationalism, xenophobia and disillusionment with democracy. Find our full coverage here.UN Security Council offers Yemen Special Envoy ‘their full support’ And finally, a landmark ruling by Botswana’s High Court that scraps laws against same-sex relationships has been welcomed by UN human rights top official, Michelle Bachelet.In a statement on Tuesday the UN High Commissioner underlined that the High Court had “unanimously found sections of the Penal Code…to be unconstitutional and a violation of human rights”.Such discrimination has impacts that go far beyond arrest and detention, Ms. Bachelet said, noting that the criminalization of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people could lead to them being denied healthcare, education, employment and housing.Botswana’s decision follows similar action in nine other countries in the past five years, including Angola, Belize, India and Trinidad and Tobago.In Kenya last month, however, a similar constitutional challenge to overturn laws that discriminate against the LGBTI community, was unsuccessful.Listen to or download our audio News In Brief for 11 June on SoundCloud: read more